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The Cast Netter – Giclee

The Cast Netter – Giclee

$675.00

The Cast Netter – Giclee Limited Edition of 125 S/N Unframed Giclee on canvas image size: 22″ x 28″

Earl Walker was a very interesting resident of Sapelo Island. He stood about 6’8″ tall with a very deep robust voice, big hands and a slender build. He loved fishing for mullet with his casting net. Earl liked to take his small boat out into the saltwater channels in search of schools of mullet fish. With the boat paddle in one hand, a casting net in the other, part of the net held with his teeth, Earl carefully maneuvered his way through the saltwater channel. One day I happened to observe him in action, he would throw the casting net in a circular motion into the school of fish. As the leaded net sank to the bottom Earl then began to pull the rope which closed the net like a giant bag. The next thing I observed was tremendous splashing on the surface, as the net was lifted from the water. He would then empty the net filled with mullet into the rowboat. From a distance I could see and hear the mullet flipping and flopping trying to escape. Earl continued to cast for more and more fish. At one point the boat was so full of fish that he could no longer move within the boat and some of his catch were jumping back into the water. The boat was overrun with mullet and it appeared to be on the verge of sinking even though Earl put on quite a show and was having the time of his life.

Description

“The Cast Netter” Limited Edition of 125 S/N Unframed Giclee on canvas image size: 22″ x 28″

 

Earl Walker was a very interesting resident of Sapelo Island. He stood about 6’8″ tall with a very deep robust voice, big hands and a slender build. He loved fishing for mullet with his casting net. Earl liked to take his small boat out into the saltwater channels in search of schools of mullet fish. With the boat paddle in one hand, a casting net in the other, part of the net held with his teeth, Earl carefully maneuvered his way through the saltwater channel. One day I happened to observe him in action, he would throw the casting net in a circular motion into the school of fish. As the leaded net sank to the bottom Earl then began to pull the rope which closed the net like a giant bag. The next thing I observed was tremendous splashing on the surface, as the net was lifted from the water. He would then empty the net filled with mullet into the rowboat. From a distance I could see and hear the mullet flipping and flopping trying to escape. Earl continued to cast for more and more fish. At one point the boat was so full of fish that he could no longer move within the boat and some of his catch were jumping back into the water. The boat was overrun with mullet and it appeared to be on the verge of sinking even though Earl put on quite a show and was having the time of his life.